Monday, February 22, 2016

Surrounded in Color.

I grew up watching Science Fiction, Horror and Adventure movies and TV shows on a small television set.  I enjoyed arts in color and in black and white. I strongly prefer the monochromatic palette with it's rich blacks, varying shades of whites and grays.  I am learning to appreciate color and it's uses in establishing mood and creating depth. I once read that "cool" colors recede while "warm" colors come forward. That's been the extent of my training in coloring. Anything else I've learned has come from the ongoing observation of colored artworks from a variety of artists and mediums.  I color with markers, colored inks, watercolors and a variety of colored pencils and China markers. I find that smooth and semi smooth Bristol board responds well to my techniques. It would perhaps be more sensible to use digital coloring as it offers an astonishing array of colors, tones and gradations as well the ability to undo errors with a mouse click.  I suppose this is the point where personality and temperament guides my creative choices.  There is a great deal of excellent art produced digitally. Similarly, there's a great deal of traditionally created artwork that's considerably enhanced by digital means. I enjoy the unpredictability of working with traditional tools.  I'm a product of a more tactile era; books had weight and volume while the paper had the texture of it's age. I frequented hole in the wall used bookstores where the promise of a undiscovered gem mingled with the smell of books. I need to feel the physical aspect of art and thus my attachment to traditional methods of production.  I applaud the ongoing advancement of digital art tools and I admire the work produced with them. In order for art to survive the human hand must always be at the helm in all of it's imprecise, uncertain and bold ways.

3 comments:

  1. I prefer traditional coloring to.

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  2. Oh, and I think I see a strong Jack kirby influence in your work.

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  3. Jack is like the Dr. Manhattan of comic books; we're all in his shadow.

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